MCM 2020: Nitro?

Okay maybe it wasn’t that fast…

Okay, dinner last night was a Whopper meal with a 24 oz. Coke, onion rings, and chicken fries. Dinner came about ten-plus hours after breakfast (7:30 Saturday morning to 5-5:30 Saturday night). Not much else to eat but junk food after that until bedtime, about 10-15 p.m.

Reveille went at 0400. I Chobani yogurt plus about a bottle and a half of water. Since I was driving out to the base, I did my Saunders cycle on Kenpo X as soon as I got dressed (about 0420).

I made it onto the base at 0452. At 0454, I realized I forgot about my bottle of Ucan Hydrate. Running without it was not an option, so I burned fifteen minutes going back home to go get it. One more set of stretching and I was off at 0525.

I was worried about the threat of rain this morning, so I wrapped my smartphone in Saran Wrap for the run. It would be dry, but MapMyRun’s voice box would be muffled. I had no idea what my splits were until I finally got rid of the Saran Wrap just after mile 8…when the sun came out.

Did I go out too fast? 10:57 is one of the fastest opening miles I have ever done, so that may have been it. What I should have done is aim for an 11:30 first mile and work my way down from there, or at least aim to maintain that pace.

Looking back at the elevation of my run, from Mile 8 onward is a slow but steady upward climb. I  know the 10 mile loop starts to climb before the runway near Test Pilots School, but I didn’t know it was a gradual uphill all the way back to my starting point at Drill Hall Gym. Mile 8 thru Mile 11 would have been about three miles of climbing.

Would. Have. been.

I started losing momentum around mile 7, and then mile 8 I knew if I could just make the climb the course would plateau out and I could build up momentum for the run up Cedar Point Road. Unfortunately, a clear voice at mile 9 announced a thirteen something split. By then I was just running through mud, or so I felt.

As I passed the Marine Aviation Detachment HQ, I felt there was no way that I was going to do anything worthwhile, trying to go up Cedar Point Road’s mile-plus long climb from the entrance road to the Drill Hall to Gate Two and back. Not happening…not today anyway.

Just past the NAWCAD Building, I slowed to a power walk. I gave no thought to a Marine Corps shuffle and trying to find a second wind. Hiked back to the Drill Hall parking lot, and as soon as MMR called out “ten miles,” I crossed the “finish line.”

So, today’s life lessons:

  1. Proper nutrition as well as proper hydration the day before a long run. Keto or no keto, there was no excuse for me to go ten hours between breakfast and a late lunch.dinner, then nothing to eat between 6:30 last night and 0400 this morning.
  2. Aim for a twelve minute pace to start on the long runs, then work to gradually get faster. The Pax River ten-mile loop can be flat in places, but it does climb near the end. Also, start at a pace you can handle.

 

Postscript: Bad eating habits. Did not Finish, Still lost three pounds.

 

Song of the Day:

Foo Fighters/”My Hero:”  

“(Lead singer/guitarist Dave) Grohl has claimed he didn’t have any rockstar rolemodels growing up. This song is a tribute to those he did look up to: the everyday people.
The sentiment on this track is simple. You don’t have to be rich, or famous or successful to do something good or heroic.

“As with many Foo Fighters songs, fans have tried to appropriate the lyrics to Nirvana frontman, Kurt Cobain, but Dave insists that they refer only to the average man on the street. Whatever the case may be, “My Hero” was still a top 10 rock smash.”

George Harrison/”Got My Mind Set on You:” From Genius:

” ‘Got My Mind Set on You’ was originally sung by James Ray in 1962.

“In 1987, George Harrison covered the song for his album Cloud Nine and his version topped the Billboard Hot 100 and Adult Contemporary chart. It also peaked at #4 on Billboard’s Mainstream Rock Tracks chart.”

Eddy Grant/”Electric Avenue:” From Genius

“Guyanese-British singer Eddy Grant’s seminal response to the 1981 Brixton riot; riots that were themselves a response to the high level of unemployment among the Caribbean immigrant population of Britain at that time.

“Throughout the song, Grant goes against the demonized account of rioters popular in the British media, instead painting a picture of poor, jobless “warriors”, struggling to even feed their family.”

 

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